A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“My girlfriend told me to go out and get something that makes her look sexy…so I got drunk” (10/17)
“How do you stop a dog from barking in the back yard?"/"Put it in the front yard.” (10/17)
“What do you call a nightmare about paper?"/"A bad ream.” (10/17)
“I’ve been cutting carbs lately—with a pizza cutter” (10/17)
“Why did the dog cross the road?"/"To get to the barking lot.” (10/17)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from October 11, 2017
“Why don’t churches have WiFi?"/"They don’t want to compete with an invisible power that works.”

American comedian Mark Normand posted a WiFi joke on Twitter on February 4, 2010:

“Churches never have wifi… I guess no church wants to compete with an invisible power that actually works.”

Normand posted the joke again—slightly differently—on Twitter on June 25, 2012:

“You never see a church with free wifi. I guess because no church wants to compete with an invisible power that actually works.”

The joke has been printed on an ecard.


Wikipedia: Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi or WiFi (/ˈwaɪfaɪ/) is a technology for wireless local area networking with devices based on the IEEE 802.11 standards. Wi-Fi is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance, which restricts the use of the term Wi-Fi Certified to products that successfully complete interoperability certification testing.

Devices that can use Wi-Fi technology include personal computers, video-game consoles, phones and tablets, digital cameras, smart TVs, digital audio players and modern printers. Wi-Fi compatible devices can connect to the Internet via a WLAN and a wireless access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (66 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors. Hotspot coverage can be as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves, or as large as many square kilometres achieved by using multiple overlapping access points.

Twitter
mark normand‏
@marknorm
Churches never have wifi… I guess no church wants to compete with an invisible power that actually works.
2:57 PM - 4 Feb 2010

Twitter
mark normand‏
@marknorm
You never see a church with free wifi. I guess because no church wants to compete with an invisible power that actually works.
1:21 PM - 25 Jun 2012

Boston (MA) Globe
8 November 2013, Boston (MA) Globe, “What’s Their Line: Meet the Comedians” by Steph Hiltz, pg. G12”
Name: Mark Normand
Age: 30
Hometown: New Orleans
How I pay the rent: I pay the rent with yuk ‘em ups. Mostly college gigs and club dates.
I’ve been doing stand-up for: Seven years and change
My best payday as a comic was: I got three grand once to roast a hedge-fund company for 10 minutes.
Best one-liner: You never see a church with free Wi-Fi, probably because no church wants to compete with an invisible power that actually works.

Twitter
Will Ferrell‏
@Will___Ferrell
You never see a church with free wifi. I guess because no church wants to compete with an invisible power that actually works.
8:26 AM - 8 Dec 2013

Reddit—Atheism
Why do you never see churches with free Wi-Fi? (self.atheism)
submitted January 24, 2017 by itslqb
Because no church wants to compete with an invisible power that actually works.
Credit to u/theconfuserx2 in r/Jokes.

Me.Me
YOU NEVER SEE CHURCHES WITH FREE WIFI BECAUSE NO CHURCH WANTS TO COMPETE WITH AN INVISIBLE POWER THAT ACTUALLY WORKS MEME
CHURCH FREE POWER WIFI NEVER TERRIBLE FACEBOOK POWERS FREES YOU WORKS BECAUSE NO SEE IMGOINGTOHELLFORTHIS ACTUALLY THAT INVISIBLE FROM R IMGOINGTOHELLFORTHIS WIFIE WIFY POWERED FREE WIFI WITH
FOUND ON 2017-05-17 07:06:27 BY ME.ME
SOURCE: ITEMS

Reddit—Jokes
Why don’t churches have WiFi?
submitted October 11, 2017 by caoash
Because they don’t want to compete with an invisible power that actually works.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityMedia/Newspapers/Magazines/Internet • Wednesday, October 11, 2017 • Permalink