A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeyes fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

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Entry from September 14, 2022
Buffalo: Chicken Wings or Buffalo Wings

Entry in progress—BP.

“Why are buffalo wings so small when buffalo are so big?” and “Stop killing buffalo for their wings” (fake protest sign) are related sayings/jokes.


Wikipedia: Buffalo wing
A Buffalo wing in American cuisine is an unbreaded chicken wing section (flat or drumette) that is generally deep-fried and then coated or dipped in a sauce consisting of a vinegar-based cayenne pepper hot sauce and melted butter prior to serving. They are traditionally served hot, along with celery sticks and carrot sticks with blue cheese dressing or, primarily outside of New York, ranch dressing for dipping. Buffalo wings are often called simply “wings”, “hot wings”, or “chicken wings.”
(...)
Origin
There are several different claims about the invention of Buffalo wings. One of the claims is that Buffalo wings were first prepared at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo, New York, by Teresa Bellissimo, who owned the bar with husband Frank in 1964. At the time, chicken wings were inexpensive and undesirable, primarily being used for stock or soup.
(...)
Although an article published about the Anchor Bar in a local newspaper during 1969 does not mention Buffalo wings, a local competitor of the Anchor Bar, Duff’s, began selling Buffalo wings in that year.

Another claim is that John Young, who moved to Buffalo from Alabama in 1948, began serving uncut chicken wings that were breaded, deep fried and served in his own special tomato based “Mambo sauce” at his Buffalo restaurant, beginning in 1961. Prior to opening his restaurant he had a conversation with a boxer who traveled and in a later interview Young recalled: “He told me that there was a restaurant in Washington, D.C. that was doing a good business with wings and I decided to specialize”. In the same interview Young stated that the Anchor Bar didn’t offer Buffalo wings as a regular menu item until 1974. He registered the name of his restaurant, John Young’s Wings ‘n Things, at the county courthouse before leaving the Buffalo area in 1970. In 2013, at the National Buffalo Wing Festival, held in Buffalo, New York, John Young’s contributions were acknowledged when he was inducted into the festival’s National Buffalo Wing Hall of Flame.

(Oxford English Dictionary)
Buffalo, n.
Cookery (orig. and chiefly U.S.).
attrib. Designating a chicken wing deep fried and coated in a spicy sauce; esp. in Buffalo chicken wing, Buffalo wing.
1980 C. Trillin in New Yorker 25 Aug. 84/1 The invention of the Buffalo chicken wing came about because of..the delivery of some chicken wings instead of the backs and necks that were ordinarily used in making spaghetti sauce.
1989 Washington Post 6 Sept. a3 At Frank and Teressa’s Anchor Bar, where Buffalo chicken wings were invented as bar snacks in 1964, owner Dominic Bellissimo sells 67,000 pounds of spicy wings each month.

Newspapers.com
29 June 1950, Daily News (New York, NY), pg. 65, col. 4 ad:
If you haven’t already tried Swanson’s Frozen Chicken Wings, you’re in for a real treat.

Newspapers.com
7 September 1950, The Pantagraph (Bloomington, IL), pg. 2, col. 2 ad:
ALL YOU CAN EAT
Fried Chicken Wings...45c
Young, Tender
Juicy, Golden Brown
Today Only
JUG BAR & GRILL
1020 W. Washington

Newspapers.com
1 July 1953, Daily News (New York, NY), pg. 56, col. 4 ad:
VERY TEMPTING TREAT
Fried Chicken Wings
with New Zest
Now it’s easy to enjoy the unusually sweet, delicate flavor of fried chicken wings.

Newspapers.com
27 October 1961, Chicago (IL) Tribune, “Mary Meade Menus for a Full Week,” pt. 3, pg. 3, col. 2:
A platter of fried chicken wings is tasty and thrifty.
(A photo is shown.—ed.)

1967-1968 BUFFALO YELLOW PAGES, pg. 483, col. 3.
ANCHOR BAR ad states “Barbequed Chicken Wings.”

Old Fulton NY Post Cards
10 February 1971, Buffalo (NY) Courier-Express, pg. 36, col. 1 ad:
AFTER
the Game
STOP
in
at “The Home
of the Famous
Chicken Wings”
Serving BARBEQUED
CHICKEN WINGS
Since 1967, many have tried to dupli-
cate them but none have come close yet.
SINGLE Order—$1.50
DOUBLE Order—$2.00
(and they are FANTASTIC)
Take-Out Orders Available
ANCHOR BAR
1047 MAIN at North
883-1134

NYC Historic Newspapers
4 March 1971, Lackawanna (NY) Leader, pg. 2, col. 3 ad:
AFTER
the Game
STOP
in
at “The Home
of the Famous
Chicken Wing”
Serving BARBEQUED
CHICKEN WINGS
Since 1967, many have tried to dupli-
cate them but none have come close yet.
SINGLE Order—$1.50
DOUBLE Order—$2.00
(and they are FANTASTIC)
Take-Out Orders Available
ANCHOR BAR
1047 MAIN at North
883-1134

NYS Historic Newspapers
18 March 1971, Lackawanna (NY) Leader, pg. 7, col. 2 ad:
AFTER
the Game
STOP
in
at “The Home
of the Famous
Chicken Wing”
Serving BARBEQUED
CHICKEN WINGS
Since 1967, many have tried to dupli-
cate them but none have come close yet.
SINGLE Order—$1.50
DOUBLE Order—$2.00
(and they are FANTASTIC)
Take-Out Orders Available
ANCHOR BAR
1047 MAIN at North
883-1134

Old Fulton NY Post Cards
13 November 1971, Buffalo (NY) Courier-Express, pg. 6, col. 4 ad:
Send ‘em
to the
Woodshed.

How do you like your
chicken wings? Mild? Medium?
Hot? We’re the only
restaurant in Buffalo to serve ‘em
exactly the way you like ‘em.

NYC Historic Newspapers
10 December 1971, The Spectrum (Buffalo, NY), pg. 20, col. 1 ad:
(EDUARDO’S at 3297 Bailey Avenue.—ed.)
ENJOY A WING DING
A Delicious Platter of Chicken Wings Served with
Celery Pieces and a Cup of Blue Cheese Dressing.

PLEASE ORDER SWEET, HOT OR MILD
SINGLE ORDER...1.50 DOUBLE ORDER...2.50

Old Fulton NY Post Cards
3 August 1972, West Buffalo-West Seneca News (NY), pg. 5, col. 3 ad:
CHICKEN WINGS
EXCITING NEW WAY!
(...)
VILLA RESTAURANT & PIZZERIA
“STILL SERVING THE FINEST PIZZA IN SOUTH BUFFALO”

NYS Historic Newspapers
6 December 1981, Buffalo (NY) Courier-Express, pg. F-2, cols. 1-6:
Patricia Ward Biederman
‘King of Wings’ Rates
Fuss and Feathers

John Young is chicken-wing history’s forgotten man.
(...)
Young, the self-styled “king of wings” insists that he is the one true originator of the Buffalo chicken wing.

Sure enough, the 47-year-old proprietor of John Young’s Wings and Things has bought, deep-fried and sold tons of little chicken limbs in his time.

“I was selling 5,000 pounds of wings in 1962,” says Young, whose receipts from Will’s Poultry have yellowed with age to the shade of a Perdue Oven-Stuffer.
(...)
Young registered the name “Young’s Wings and Things” with the Erie County Clerk’s Office in 1966, but he’s actually eaten chicken wings for decades.
(...)
He remembers the very moment a new food was born—an occasion he would not describe as Bellissimo. The year was 1962, and Young had a store at Jefferson and High that catered to hungry teen-agers. One day he was shooting the breeze with his friend Sam Anderson, who had just come back from Washington, D.C.

“John,” said Sam, “you got that good barbecue sauce. You know, in Washington, D.C., people are going crazy over chicken wings.”
(...)
Young doesn’t deny that the Bellissimos contributed to the evolution of the Buffalo chicken wing. Concedes Young, “That’s the credit I give Frank for, coming up with the blue cheese and celery. They did do that.”

When you buy one of Young’s original-style wings, you get both halves, elbow unsevered, not two drumettes. And Young’s classic version is smothered in his special “mombo sauce.” A secret blend of 24 herbs and spices, mombo sauce is the key to the success of his wings, says Young, who acquired the recipe in Jamaica from an old man in a sugar cane field. At his present location, Young sells 2,300 pounds of wings weekly, mostly with mombo sauce.

“I bet I don’t get three calls a week for blue cheese and celery,” he adds.

Murdoch Mysteries Wiki
“From Buffalo With Love” is the seventeenth episode of the ninth season of the Murdoch Mysteries and the one hundredth thirty-first episode of the series. It first aired on March 14, 2016.
(...)
. This episode takes place in Toronto 1903 (...)
. In his desperate hunger, Brackenreid unwittingly creates the Buffalo wing. Prior to the latter half of the twentieth century, chicken wings were considered extremely low-quality cuts of meat, generally used only for stock or discarded altogether. The Buffalo restaurant owner even comments, “The Canadians are eating our garbage!”
. The world famous Buffalo wing was invented in Buffalo, New York, now the Chicken Wing Capital of the World, but there are competing origin stories as to who actually invented them in the 1960s. The pub, where Brackenreid enjoys his prescient chicken wings, is an allusion to the most popular Anchor Bar origin story; The fictional pub displays many anchors in homage. The first full-time chicken wing restaurant in Buffalo was John Young’s Wings N’ Things (1961-67); Then there’s the Pavillion wings from Pavillion, NY, a small town about an hour east of Buffalo that dates to the 1950s and Duff’s Famous Wings first advertised in 1969. The oldest recipe is the Imperial Consort Chicken Wing (750 AD).

Posted by Barry Popik
Nicknames of Other PlacesNew York State • Wednesday, September 14, 2022 • Permalink