A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

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Entry from October 02, 2019
“Fraud vitiates everything” (legal maxim)

"Fraud vitiates everything” is a legal maxim. If a contract was entered into on the basis of a fraud, the contract can be declared null and void.

“Fraud could vitiate every contract” was printed in the Gazette of the United States (Philadelphia, PA) on January 30, 1793. “Fraud would vitiate any transaction” was printed in The Evening Mail (London, UK) on February 29, 1796. “But I consider it as a universal principle that fraud vitiates every contract” was printed in the Aurora General Advertiser (Philadelphia, PA) on October 16, 1804.

“It is a maxim of British jurisprudence that fraud vitiates everything” was printed in The Freeman’s Journal (Dublin, Ireland) on October 13, 1838. “In the eye of the law fraud vitiates everything it touches” was printed in the Indiana (PA) Democrat on April 15, 1869.


Newspapers.com
30 January 1793, Gazette of the United States (Philadelphia, PA), pg. 1, col. 4:
That it would be unconstitutional to destroy the contract of the parties, when made bona fide, and it was agreed that fraud could vitiate every contract, for which the courts of justice were adequate ... 

Newspapers.com
29 February 1796, The Evening Mail (London, UK), pg. 1, col. 2:
The circumstance which he urged next was, that they were drawn on unstamped paper; and having state it to be a principle in the administration of justice that fraud would vitiate any transaction, he said, that if an action was brought against an acceptor or drawer of these Bills, the circumstance of their being really inland, though pretended to be foreign, and thus having a fictitious date as to time and place, would so vitiate them, that the Bills and the right of action would fall to the ground.

1 March 1796, The Times (London, UK), pg. 2, col. 2:
The circumstance which he urged next was, that they were drawn on unstamped paper; and having state it to be a principle in the administration of justice that fraud would vitiate any transaction, he said, that if an action was brought against an acceptor or drawer of these Bills, the circumstance of their being really inland, though pretended to be foreign, and thus having a fictitious date as to time and place, would so vitiate them, that the Bills and the right of action would fall to the ground.

16 October 1804, Aurora General Advertiser (Philadelphia, PA), pg. 3, col. 1:
But I consider it as a universal principle that fraud vitiates every contract; and that consequently if this contract was entered into fraudulently it was null from the moment of its formation.

Newspapers.com
17 January 1810, The Bury and Norwich Post (Bury, UK), pg. 3, col. 2:
... the court quashed the order of removal with full costs, remarking that fraud vitiates every transaction.

13 October 1838, The Freeman’s Journal (Dublin, Ireland), pg. 3, col. 4:
It is a maxim of British jurisprudence that fraud vitiates everything.

15 April 1869, Indiana (PA) Democrat, “Covode vs. Foster,” pg. 2, col. 2:
In the report of the majority in favor of admitting Covode, it is said that, “in the eye of the law fraud vitiates everything it touches; even the broad seat of a Commonwealth is crumbled into dust as against the interest designed to be defrauded.”

Facebook
Freedom Is A State Of Mind
June 12, 2013 ·
Fraud vitiates everything it touches. (common law maxim) Nudd v. Burrows (1875) 91 U.S. 416.

Fraud destroys the validity of everything into which it enters. Boyce’s Executors v. Grundy (1830) 28 U.S. 210.

Fraud vitiates the most solemn contracts, documents and even judgments. United States v. Throckmorton (1878) 98 JU.S. 61, 70.

Most, if not all agreements you entered into with the government are fraudulent on several counts, rendering them null and void form the start. Coercion was used, full disclosure was never given etc. It is up to you to correct your standing from their presumed legal person to the living man or woman.

Twitter
Cara Wadsworth
@USAShopper
Top Ten 9/11 Cons: “Fraud Vitiates Everything” (FVE) http://veteranstoday.com/2014/08/21/top-ten-911-cons-fraud-vitiates-everything-fve/
12:35 AM · Aug 27, 2014·Twitter Web Client

Twitter
J. Gallagher
@JRyG33
Common law maxim: Fraud vitiates everything it touches. #NeverForget
2:39 AM · Sep 11, 2014·Twitter for iPhone

Twitter
New Human New Earth
@NuHumanNuEarth
An old Maxim of law says it all:
“FRAUD VITIATES EVERYTHING.” https://anticorruptionsociety.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/the-corporate-government.pdf
2:11 PM · Aug 27, 2016·Twitter Web Client

Twitter
Ghosttribe
@JustinN21710331
2d 393 (1962) ("It is axiomatic that fraud vitiates everything."); Dunham v. Dunham, 57 http://Ill.App 475 (1894), affirmed 162 Ill. 589 (1896); Skelly Oil Co. v. Universal Oil Products Co., 338 http://Ill.App. 79, 86
2:22 AM · Sep 3, 2019·Twitter Web App

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityGovernment/Law/Politics/Military • Wednesday, October 02, 2019 • Permalink