A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

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Entry from October 04, 2019
Hummingbird Cake

Entry in progress—B.P.


Wikipedia: Hummingbird Cake
Hummingbird cake is a banana-pineapple spice cake common in the Southern United States. Ingredients include flour, sugar, salt, vegetable oil, ripe banana, pineapple, cinnamon, pecans, vanilla extract, eggs, and leavening agent. It is often served with cream cheese frosting.

History
Created on the island of Jamaica, hummingbird cake was named after the island’s national bird, where it is also known as the Doctor Bird cake (Doctor Bird is another name for the island’s national bird). In 1968, the Jamaica Tourist Board exported the recipe for hummingbird cake, along with other local Jamaican recipes, in media press kits sent to the USA. The marketing was aimed at American consumers to get them to come to the island. As printed in the March 29, 1979 issue of the Kingston Daily Gleaner (Jamaica), “Press kits presented included Jamaican menu modified for American kitchens, and featured recipes like the doctor bird cake, made from bananas.”

delish
Hummingbird Cake
by LAURA REGE
MAR 22, 2019
What is hummingbird cake?
Although it’s a classic Southern dessert, most people on the Delish team had never heard of this cake until it came time to develop a recipe. Now everyone is seriously OBSESSED. If you’ve never had it, it’s kinda like a cross between carrot cake and banana bread. 

Fun fact: Hummingbird cake is actually from Jamaica! It was originally called “Doctor Bird Cake,” which is a nickname for a type of Jamaican hummingbird. People say the cake earned its name because it was sweet enough to attract hummingbirds. The recipe made its way to the States somewhere in the 1960s, when the Jamaican tourist board sent over press kits to promote tourism. 

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Friday, October 04, 2019 • Permalink