A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

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Entry from November 01, 2019
Marinara Sauce

Marinara sauce probably originated at Bucci’s, a famous fish place in Rome, Italy. “Fish and ‘zuppa alla marinara’” was printed in Italy, Handbook for Travellers: Central Italy and Rome (1883) by Karl Baedeker. “Marinara” is similar to the words “marine” or “mariner”—of the sea.

“Native Dishes of Italy,” an article in The Sun (New York, NY) on March 22, 1908, stated, “There are deep plates piled with fresh water mussels prepared with a rich brown sauce called ‘zuppa marinara,’ which might serve as a soup or a solid, so thick and rich is it.” An article in Vogue (New York, NY), on June 15, 1914, explained further: “At Bucci’s may be obtained the queer and distinctly Italian dish for which the place is famous, the ‘Zuppa alla Marinara,’ which is a thick and very salty tomato sauce poured over small, whole, boiled fish, and served like fish chowder.”

“The four main spaghetti sauces are (...) the Marinara sauce, made of tomatoes and peppers, quite hot and flavorful with thyme, garlic, etc.” was printed in the San Francisco (CA) Examiner on January 11, 1925.


Wikipedia: Marinara sauce
Marinara ("mariner’s") sauce is a tomato sauce, usually made with tomatoes, garlic, herbs, and onions. Its many variations can include the addition of capers, olives, spices, and a dash of wine.

This sauce is widely used in Italian-American cuisine, which has diverged from its Old World origins.

In Italy, alla marinara properly refers to a sauce made with tomatoes, basil, oregano and sometimes olives, capers and salted anchovies; it is used for spaghetti and vermicelli, but also with meat or fish.

(Oxford English Dictionary)
marinara, adj. (and n.)
Etymology: < Italian (alla) marinara sailor-fashion (mid 19th cent.; compare earlier alla marinaresca (1544)) < marinaro seafaring (1869; 13th cent. as masculine noun), non-Tuscan development < post-classical Latin marinarius mariner n.
Designating any of various Italian dishes or sauces (esp. a spicy tomato sauce traditionally made in Naples) whose ingredients are suggestive either of food formerly served on board ships (by the absence of fresh produce such as cheese or cream, or by the liberal use of herbs, spices, etc.) or of the sea itself (by the use of seafood). Frequently as postmodifier. Also as n.
[1905 M. Gironci Ital. Recipes 28 Eggs alla Marinara.]
1932 A. Hirschfeld Manhattan Oases 72 The spaghetti marinara is uncommonly good.
1946 N.Y. Herald Tribune 5 Jan. 9/5 Marinara sauce was added.

Google Books
Italy, Handbook for Travellers:
Central Italy and Rome

By Karl Baedeker
Leipzig, Germany: Karl Baedeker
1883
Pg. 106:
Bucci, Pescheria delle Coppelle 54-57 (fish and ‘zuppa alla marinara’ ).

Newspapers.com
22 March 1908, The Sun (New York, NY), “Native Dishes of Italy,” pg. 8, col. 3:
Certainly one of the most interesting eating places in Rome is Bucci’s, although it is by no means the most elegant or expensive. It is situated in the oldest part of the city, just around the Pantheon. Bucci might be considered analogous to the old Dorion establishment that used to be in Fulton market. He is the principal fish dealer of Rome, famous especially for his “zuppa marinara” and other products of fresh and salt water.
(Col. 4.—ed.)
There are deep plates piled with fresh water mussels prepared with a rich brown sauce called “zuppa marinara,” which might serve as a soup or a solid, so thick and rich is it.

Newspapers.com
26 May 1912, Pittsburg (PA) Press, Sunday Magazine, pg. 5, col. 5:
ITALIAN COOK RECIPES
Some of the Favorites of a Well Known Italian Chef.
(...)
But to taste Italian cookery in perfection one must be taken as a guest to the Circolo Nazionale Italiano (Italian National Club), No. 11 East Forty-fourth street, the membership of which is composed of all the wealthier Italians in the city, with a small sprinkling of Americans who have close business or social relations with them.
(...)
BY CARLO LENTINI.
Chef of the Italian National Club, New York.
(...)
SPAGHETTI ALLA MARINARA. —(...) The sauce alla marinara is prepared as follows: Chop an onion and a clove of garlic fine and fry them in olive oil; add a few clams, either whole or chopped as you prefer, and cook for five minutes; then pour the whole over the spaghetti. Cheese should not be served with this.

15 June 1914, Vogue (New York, NY) “Travel: Aveta Fame?,” pg. 76, col. 3:
At Bucci’s may be obtained the queer and distinctly Italian dish for which the place is famous, the “Zuppa alla Marinara,” which is a thick and very salty tomato sauce poured over small, whole, boiled fish, and served like fish chowder.

Newspapers.com
26 December 1924, St. Louis (MO) Daily Globe-Democrat, “Story of Spaghetti Related by Widely Known Expert Chef; Most Pastes Used in but Two Ways, He Explains” by Christine Frederick, pg. 16, col. 8:
“Last, but best of all, is the Marinara sauce. Ah, that is a good sauce, what you say? Hot, with the tang, very good; it has the tomato, the spagnolini (our red pepper). the regano or dry parsley, the herbs, everything to make the sauce delicious. it is much better than what you call your tomato sauce with only tomatoes.” (...)—From the Designer Magazine for January.

Newspapers.com
11 January 1925, San Francisco (CA) Examiner, “Spaghetti and Nourishing Flour Pastes:” by Christine Frederick, American Weekly, pg. 15, col. 3:
The four main spaghetti sauces are (...) the Marinara sauce, made of tomatoes and peppers, quite hot and flavorful with thyme, garlic, etc.; ...
(...)
Macaroni with Marinara Sauce.

Newspapers.com
10 April 1930, The Standard Union (Brooklyn, NY), pg. 8, col. 4:
MAKER OF FINE ITALIAN SAUCES
Romolo Company Tempts Epicurean Palates With Tasty Products
(...)
A Brooklyn organization that specializes in the making of these tomato sauces is the Romolo Italian Products Corp. of 4821 Seventh avenue.
(...)
The company makes three kinds of tomato sauce; a meat sauce, a mushroom sauce and a plain Marinara sauce.

Newspapers.com
24 June 1933, Pittsburgh (PA) Post-Gazette, “Bostonian Winner In Spaghetti Gorge” by James R. George, pg. 1, col. 6:
Splashing through the last half-pint of marinara sauce amid several cheers, Tony Leswaa of Boston was proclaimed the spaghetti-eating champion of the United States, Mexico and various other sections last night at the end of the big international inhaling contest at Charlie Perrone’s beer garden in Miller street, Rankin.

Newspapers.com
19 June 1936. Miami (FL) Daily News, “Record Made of Favorite Foods in Varied Combination,” Food Magazine, pg. 1, col. 4:
Marinara Spaghetti

Newspapers.com
12 October 1936, The Salt Lake Tribune (Salt Lake City, UT), “Memory Lane” by I. C. Brenner, pg. 6, col. 5:
her favorite indoor sport is making spaghetti with a special sauce called “marinara.”

Newspapers.com
4 December 1937, The Daily Record (Long Branch, NJ), pg. 1, col. 4 ad:
Free Tonight
Spaghetti a la marinara.

Newspapers.com
30 June 1938, Brooklyn (NY) Daily Eagle, pg. 10, col. 4 ad:
Spaghetti, Marinara Sauce (meatless) and Parmesan Style Cheese.
(Martini.—ed.)

YouTube
Marinara Sauce Recipe
Mar 10, 2017
Lidia Bastianich
Learn more about San Marzano tomatoes: https://www.cento.com/

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Friday, November 01, 2019 • Permalink