A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
Texalina (Texas + Carolina) barbecue (3/19)
Slutgers (Rutgers University nickname) (3/19)
Fairly Ridiculous (Fairleigh Dickinson University nickname) (3/19)
The Shawarma (nickname of Vessel at Hudson Yards) (3/19)
“Lobster rolls not gender roles” (3/19)
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Entry from January 20, 2019
Okonomiyaki (Japanese Pizza)

Entry in progress—B.P.

Wikipedia: Okonomiyaki
Okonomiyaki (お好み焼き o-konomi-yaki) is a Japanese savory pancake containing a variety of ingredients. The name is derived from the word okonomi, meaning “how you like” or “what you like”, and yaki meaning “cooked” (usually fried). Okonomiyaki is mainly associated with the Kansai or Hiroshima areas of Japan, but is widely available throughout the country. Toppings and batters tend to vary according to region. In Tokyo, there is a semi-liquid okonomiyaki called ‘monjayaki.’

Kansai area
Kansai- or Osaka-style okonomiyaki is the predominant version of the dish, found throughout most of Japan. The batter is made of flour, grated nagaimo (a type of yam), water or dashi, eggs and shredded cabbage, and usually contains other ingredients such as green onion, meat (generally thin pork belly, often mistaken for bacon), octopus, squid, shrimp, vegetables, konjac, mochi or cheese. Okonomiyaki is sometimes compared to an omelette or a pancake and may be referred to as a “Japanese pizza” or “Osaka soul food”.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Sunday, January 20, 2019 • Permalink