A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

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Entry from March 09, 2010
“That money talks, I’ll not deny, I heard it once: It said, ‘Goodbye‘“

"Money talks” (meaning that money has influence) is an old financial saying, cited in print in various forms from before 1700. “Money talks” was printed in several American newspapers in 1868. 

American poet and author Richard Armour (1906-1989) wrote the following: 

“That money talks
I won’t deny.
I heard it once.
It said, “Goodbye.”

Although Armour popularized this version of the proverb “money talks,” the following was published in the Philadelphia (PA) Press in 1904:

His Experience.
That “money talks” I’ll not deny
May be quite untrue.
But it more often says “Goodby”
Than “How-dy-do.”
-- Philadelphia Press.


Zazzle.com
If money could talk, it would say goodbye.
t-shirts
Product id: 235470865770504369
Made on 1/10/2008 3:51 PM

Wikipedia: Richard Armour
Richard Willard Armour (July 15, 1906 – February 28, 1989) was an American poet and author who wrote over sixty-five books.
(...)
Armour wrote funny poems in a style reminiscent of Ogden Nash. These poems were often featured in newspaper Sunday supplements in a feature called Armour’s Armory. Many of Armour’s poems have been repeatedly and incorrectly attributed to Nash. Probably Armour’s most-quoted poem (often attributed to Nash) is the quatrain: “Shake and shake / the catsup bottle / first none’ll come / and then a lot’ll.” Another popular quatrain of his, also usually attributed erroneously to Nash, is: “Nothing attracts / the mustard from wieners / as much as the slacks / just back from the cleaners.”

The Gladdest Thing
Money
That money talks
I won’t deny.
I heard it once.
It said, “Goodbye.”
— Richard Armour

16 January 1904, Flint (MI) Journal, pg. 2, col. 4:
His Experience.
That “money talks” I’ll not deny
May be quite untrue.
But it more often says “Goodby”
Than “How-dy-do.”
-- Philadelphia Press.

Google Books
The Accountant, Detroit
v. 5-6 - 1913
Pg. ?:
IF MONEY TALKS,
I WONDER WHY
I ONLY HEAR
IT SAY “GOODBYE?”

Newspapers.com
3 September 1971, The Arizona Daily Star (Tucson, AZ), “Speaking of Dollars” (Los Angeles Times), sec. C, pg. 6, col. 1:
Speaking Dollar-Wise, courtesy of humorist Richard Armour:

“That money talks, I’ll not deny.
I heard it once: It said ‘Good bye.’”

Google Books
The Guinness Book of Money
By Leslie Dunkling and Adrian Room
London: Guinness
1990
Pg. 130:
The poet Richard Armour has said:
‘That money talks
I’ll not deny, I heard it once:
It said “Goodbye”.’

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityBanking/Finance/Insurance • Tuesday, March 09, 2010 • Permalink