A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

Recent entries:
“Well-behaved women rarely make history. Or decent margaritas” (8/13)
“Well-behaved women rarely ever make history. Or a decent soufflé” (8/13)
“Hot sauce is just sexy ketchup” (8/13)
Entry in progress—BP (8/13)
“I don’t use my blinkers because it’s nobody’s business where I’m going” (8/13)
More new entries...

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Entry from October 29, 2019
Toffee Apple

Wikipedia: Candy apple
Candy apples, also known as toffee apples outside of North America, are whole apples covered in a hard toffee or sugar candy coating, with a stick inserted as a handle. These are a common treat at autumn festivals in Western culture in the Northern Hemisphere, such as Halloween and Guy Fawkes Night because these festivals fall in the wake of the annual apple harvest. Although toffee apples and caramel apples may seem similar, they are made using distinctly different processes.
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Ingredients and method
Toffee apples are made by coating an apple with a layer of sugar that has been heated to hard crack stage (depending upon the type of sugar). The most common sugar coating is made from sugar (white or brown), corn syrup, water, cinnamon and red food coloring. Humid weather can prevent the sugar from hardening.

YouTube
How to make Toffee Apples
Feb 1, 2012
Todd’s Kitchen
Toffee apple are extremely easy to make at home and at a fraction of the cost.
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Ingredients:

6 Apples
2 cups sugar
1 cup water
1/2 tsp Cream of Tartar

South Florida Reporter
1950 Kraft Produces The Caramel Apple; In 1960 The Caramel Apple Machine Was Invented
By SouthFloridaReporter.com - Oct 30, 2017
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. Soldiers in World War I slanged them “toffee apples.” Candy Apples are popular all over the world.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Tuesday, October 29, 2019 • Permalink